Feb 25, 2022
Award-winning documentary, ‘The Last Harvest,’ to be part of watch party

Driscoll’s award-winning documentary, “The Last Harvest,” is heading to the big screen at the SXSW film festival, giving viewers a rare glimpse into the critical labor shortage problem in the agricultural industry – and the challenges facing those who grow and harvest our food.

The documentary will be screened Tuesday, March 15, at 5:30 p.m. CDT as part of the Food Film Viewing Parties at SXSW in Austin, Texas. Screenings will be followed by a panel discussion with Driscoll’s President of the Americas Soren Bjorn, as well as Food Tank’s Danielle Nierenberg.

Produced in 2019 and released at regional film-festivals, “The Last Harvest” offers a rare glimpse into the hopes, hardships, and uncertain futures of three family growers and the lives of those harvesting food in the 21st century. The film explores how immigration reform, an improved guest worker program, and innovation and collaboration can provide solutions.

The free screening at SXSW is available for in-person viewing or through livestream by registering through the SXSW event page. Presented and sponsored by Driscoll’s, Food Tank, SXSW, and Huston-Tillotson University, the screening of “The Last Harvest” is part of a two-day series from Monday, March 14 – Tuesday, March 15, 2022 at Agard-Lovinggood Auditorium on the campus of Huston-Tillotson University, located at 900 Chicon Street, Austin, Texas 78702. The series will highlight a variety of food and farming topics in the US and beyond. The film lineup also includes “Gather,” “Man in the Field” and “Ants and the Grasshopper.

“Driscoll’s is a proud sponsor of the Food Film Viewing Parties at SXSW and we’re grateful the festival is a powerful platform for us to share our documentary, The Last Harvest,” Bjorn said in a news release. “Driscoll’s will always be an advocate for immigrants and farmworkers. We need to shed light on the need for meaningful immigration reform.”

Viewers interested in supporting immigration reform can take action via the National Immigration Forum, which urges Congress to provide a pathway to legalization for undocumented farmworkers and enhance the H-2A guestworker program.

The in-person SXSW film events are free and open to the public, however space is extremely limited. A SXSW badge is not necessary to view or participate in screenings, but separate registration is required for each of the four films. Food will be provided after each viewing and panel discussion. Please visit www.sxsw.com for more festival information.

Driscoll’s is the global market leader of fresh strawberries, blueberries, raspberries and blackberries. With more than 100 years of farming heritage, Driscoll’s is a pioneer of berry flavor innovation and the trusted consumer brand of Only the Finest Berries.

With more than 900 independent growers around the world, Driscoll’s develops exclusive patented berry varieties using only traditional breeding methods that focus on growing great tasting berries. A dedicated team of agronomists, breeders, sensory analysts, plant pathologists and entomologists help grow baby seedlings that are then grown on local family farms.

Driscoll’s now serves consumers year-round across North America, Australia, Europe and China in over 22 countries. As a fourth-generation grower and the son of one of Driscoll’s founders, J. Miles Reiter serves as chairman and CEO.




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