Aug 8, 2022
Lost Oak Winery to release two new varietals for 2022 harvest

Lost Oak Winery, a family-owned and operated winery located in Burleson, Texas, announces a partnership with Texas grape grower Jet Wilmeth, owner of Diamante Doble Vineyard. The partnership and the 2022 harvest season is highlighted by two, niche varieties, Roussanne and Trebbiano.

“Wine connoisseurs can expect an incredible, unique harvest thanks to our partnership with Jet Wilmeth,” said Roxanne Myers, president of Lost Oak Winery. “With over 22 years of experience as one of the best growers in Texas, Lost Oak is thrilled to start our harvest season and help wine lovers expand their beliefs on what Texas wine looks like.”

As the regular Texas grape harvest season begins in early August, the Lone Star State enjoys favorable elevation, more sunlight, and good quality fruit yields that will support experimentation with two niche varietals that grow well in Texas.

“Harvest season is earlier in Texas because of sunlight, but it is based on varieties,” Wilmeth said. “We have to get the grapes off a bit sooner due to the increase in heat; leaving them for too long into the warm season can put stress on the vine.”

Wilmeth began his farming career as a Texas cotton, peanut, watermelon, jalapeño, cucumber and chili farmer but eventually wondered how to get the most out of his most precious resource, water. After learning grapes have deeper roots that require less water and offer more longevity, Wilmeth embarked on an educational winemaking journey, ending with him planting his first five acres of cabernet sauvignon grapes in 2000 and founding Diamante Doble Vineyard. Lost Oak Winery has won numerous awards with the fruit from Diamante Doble and looks to continue putting Texas wine on the map with new varieties Roussanne and Trebbiano.

Roussanne — Rich and complex, with distinct honey, floral, and apricot flavors. Roussanne ages well due to its unusual combination of richness, minerality, and balancing acids. Beautiful russet grape colors flourish in the unique landscape and climate of Texas. While most white wines cannot be barrel-aged or served with red meat, Roussanne is unique with its creamy, full-bodied finish that allows for an extended aging process and versatile dinner pairing.

Trebbiano — This white wine uniquely grows well in the Texas climate, offering a mouthwateringly crisp taste with scents of tropical fruit and citrus blossom with flavors of pear and melon. With the vast majority of Texas Trebbiano coming from Lost Oak Winery and the Texas High Plains AVA, it is dry and crisp without any harsh flavors, as there is plenty of Texas sunlight to fully ripen the grapes.

“Our successful experimentation with the Roussanne and Trebbiano varieties allows wine lovers to expand their palate and step outside of their comfort zone with new flavors,” said Meyers. “There are so many delicious, unique wines outside of standard grocery store options, and we’re excited that the Lost Oak tasting room will offer the opportunity to try locally grown Texas wine.”

Lost Oak and Wilmeth are excited to continue putting the Lone Star State on the map with their wine, which — they are proud to proclaim — is “100% Texas.”

To learn more, visit www.lostoakwinery.com.


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